The Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to maximize telehealth’s ability to improve health outcomes, care delivery, and cost effectiveness.

CCHP Newsroom

  • USDA Funds Telemedicine Projects in 16 States

    Advance Healthcare Network

    Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that USDA is investing in 18 projects in 16 states to use communications technology to expand access to healthcare, substance misuse treatment and advanced educational opportunities.  “These investments will help provide better health care and educational opportunities for rural residents,” Vilsack said. “Hospitals, schools and training centers across the country are successfully using telecommunications to deliver quality educational and medical services. Telemedicine, for example, can help treat patients who are struggling with opioid and other substance use disorders that disproportionately affect rural areas by allowing rural hospitals to connect with resources in other health care facilities across the country to better diagnose and treat individuals.” In January, President Obama tapped Secretary Vilsack to lead an interagency effort focused on the rural opioid epidemic, according to the announcement. 

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  • New Jersey Moves to Regulate Telehealth

    mHealth Intelligence

    One of the last states to regulate telehealth is moving forward with legislation that would permit video visits and consults and store-and-forward technology – but not healthcare delivered by phone, e-mail or text message. The New Jersey Senate’s health committee has unanimously approved S.291, which would enable clinicians in the Garden State to establish a valid physician-patient relationship via telehealth, require state health plans and private plans that cover state employees to reimburse at the same rate as in-person care, and prevent those plans from mandating an in-person visit before telehealth use. The bill also allows out-of-state healthcare providers to treat New Jersey residents via telehealth as long as they have a reciprocal medical license; New Jersey lawmakers enacted a rule in 2014 allowing doctors from other states to treat patient in New Jersey as long as the medical license they hold in their state aligns with New Jersey requirements.

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  • New Report Charts Slow Progress for Telehealth Reimbursement

    mHealth Intelligence

    Telehealth is slowly becoming an accepted means of delivering healthcare, according to the latest state-by-state analysis of the Center for Connected Health Policy. An update of the CCHP’s fourth annual report, issued in March, finds that three states have added store-and-forward telehealth to their Medicaid programs and three have added some form of remote patient monitoring since that time. Of special note, Hawaii has mandated, as of 2017, that liability insurers provide malpractice insurance for providers using telehealth at the same rate for in-person services. “This may inspire other states to introduce similar legislation in the future,” the report stated. The August edition of CCHP’s “State Telehealth laws and Medicaid Program Policies,” a 244-page update of the organization’s March report, notes that states are moving slowly, and in a piecemeal fashion, toward telehealth adoption and reimbursement. In all, it said, 44 states have introduced more than 150 telehealth-related pieces of legislation this year. The CCHP, one of 14 federal telehealth resource centers scattered across the country, notes that while some states are moving forward, others are enacting laws “to restrict or place limitations on telehealth delivered services.”

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